Use of male condoms or female condoms may help prevent the spread of trichomoniasis,[22] although careful studies have never been done that focus on how to prevent this infection. Infection with Trichomoniasis through water is unlikely because Trichomonas vaginalis dies in water after 45–60 minutes, in thermal water after 30 minutes to 3 hours and in diluted urine after 5–6 hours.[23]
Bacterial vaginosis is an abnormal vaginal condition with signs and symptoms of vaginal discharge, vaginal odor, and vaginal pain. Bacterial vaginosis results from an overgrowth of normal bacteria in the vagina. Although it may cause some disturbing symptoms (discharge and odor), it is not dangerous and cannot be passed by sex. Diagnosis becomes important to exclude serious infections like gonorrhea and Chlamydia. Many treatment options are available such as oral antibiotics and vaginal gels.

Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) which is most often spread through vaginal, oral, or anal sex.[1] It can also spread through genital touching.[1] People who are infected may spread the disease even when symptoms are not present.[2] Diagnosis is by finding the parasite in the vaginal fluid using a microscope, culturing the vagina or urine, or testing for the parasite's DNA.[1] If present other STIs should be tested for.[1]


Most people infected with Trichomonas vaginalis do not have any symptoms and can be undetected for years.[6] Symptoms experienced include pain, burning or itching in the penis, urethra (urethritis), or vagina (vaginitis). Discomfort for both sexes may increase during intercourse and urination. For women there may also be a yellow-green, itchy, frothy, foul-smelling ("fishy" smell) vaginal discharge. In rare cases, lower abdominal pain can occur. Symptoms usually appear within 5 to 28 days of exposure.[7] Sometimes trichomoniasis can be confused with chlamydia because the symptoms are similar.[8]

For 95-97% of cases, infection is resolved after one dose of metronidazole.[26][35] Studies suggest that 4-5% of trichomonas cases are resistant to metronidazole, which may account for some “repeat” cases.[33][9] Without treatment, trichomoniasis can persist for months to years in women, and is thought to improve without treatment in men.[9] Women living with HIV infection have better cure rates if treated for 7 days rather than with one dose.[31][36]
Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) which is most often spread through vaginal, oral, or anal sex.[1] It can also spread through genital touching.[1] People who are infected may spread the disease even when symptoms are not present.[2] Diagnosis is by finding the parasite in the vaginal fluid using a microscope, culturing the vagina or urine, or testing for the parasite's DNA.[1] If present other STIs should be tested for.[1]
^ Epstein, Aaron; Roy, Subir (2010). "Chapter 50: Vulvovaginitis". In Goodwin, T. Murphy (ed.). Management of Common Problems in Obstetrics and Gynecology (5th ed.). Wiley-Blackwell. p. 228. ISBN 978-1405169165. Archived from the original on 2017-02-15. In 80% of cases, the diagnosis of trichomoniasis is confirmed by microscopic examination of saline wet mount, with the observation of motile trichominondas; their shape is "football-like" with moving flagella.
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