^ Epstein, Aaron; Roy, Subir (2010). "Chapter 50: Vulvovaginitis". In Goodwin, T. Murphy (ed.). Management of Common Problems in Obstetrics and Gynecology (5th ed.). Wiley-Blackwell. p. 228. ISBN 978-1405169165. Archived from the original on 2017-02-15. In 80% of cases, the diagnosis of trichomoniasis is confirmed by microscopic examination of saline wet mount, with the observation of motile trichominondas; their shape is "football-like" with moving flagella.
The advent of new, highly specific and sensitive trichomoniasis tests present opportunities for new screening protocols for both men and women.[24][27] Careful planning, discussion, and research are required to determine the cost-efficiency and most beneficial use of these new tests for the diagnosis and treatment of trichomoniasis in the U.S., which can lead to better prevention efforts.[24][27]

^ Kissinger P, Mena L, Levison J, Clark RA, Gatski M, Henderson H, et al. (December 2010). "A randomized treatment trial: single versus 7-day dose of metronidazole for the treatment of Trichomonas vaginalis among HIV-infected women". Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 55 (5): 565–71. doi:10.1097/qai.0b013e3181eda955. PMC 3058179. PMID 21423852.
For 95-97% of cases, infection is resolved after one dose of metronidazole.[26][35] Studies suggest that 4-5% of trichomonas cases are resistant to metronidazole, which may account for some “repeat” cases.[33][9] Without treatment, trichomoniasis can persist for months to years in women, and is thought to improve without treatment in men.[9] Women living with HIV infection have better cure rates if treated for 7 days rather than with one dose.[31][36]

Currently there are no routine standard screening requirements for the general U.S. population receiving family planning or STI testing.[24][25] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends Trichomoniasis testing for females with vaginal discharge[26] and can be considered for females at higher risk for infection or of HIV-positive serostatus.[24]

Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by a parasite. The parasite is spread most often through vaginal, oral, or anal sex. It is one of the most common STIs in the United States and affects more women than men. It is easily treated with antibiotics, but many women do not have symptoms. If left untreated, trichomoniasis can raise your risk of getting HIV.


^ Epstein, Aaron; Roy, Subir (2010). "Chapter 50: Vulvovaginitis". In Goodwin, T. Murphy (ed.). Management of Common Problems in Obstetrics and Gynecology (5th ed.). Wiley-Blackwell. p. 228. ISBN 978-1405169165. Archived from the original on 2017-02-15. In 80% of cases, the diagnosis of trichomoniasis is confirmed by microscopic examination of saline wet mount, with the observation of motile trichominondas; their shape is "football-like" with moving flagella.
Evidence from a randomized controlled trials for screening pregnant women who do not have symptoms for infection with trichomoniasis and treating women who test positive for the infection have not consistently shown a reduced risk of preterm birth.[29][30] Further studies are needed to verify this result and determine the best method of screening. In the US, screening of pregnant women without any symptoms is only recommended in those with HIV as trichomonas infection is associated with increased risk of transmitting HIV to the fetus.[31]
If you’re pregnant, trich may make you give birth earlier than expected. Your baby may have a low birth weight, which can raise the chances of health or developmental problems. It’s rare, but your baby may also get trich as they go through the birth canal. You can get treated for trich while pregnant, so talk to your doctor about the best options for you.
Use condoms. Condoms are the best way to prevent STIs when you have sex. Because a man does not need to ejaculate (come) to give or get trichomoniasis, make sure to put the condom on before the penis touches the vagina, mouth, or anus. Other methods of birth control, like birth control pills, shots, implants, or diaphragms, will not protect you from STIs. Get tested. Be sure you and your partner are tested for STIs. Talk to each other about the test results before you have sex.
^ Kissinger P, Mena L, Levison J, Clark RA, Gatski M, Henderson H, et al. (December 2010). "A randomized treatment trial: single versus 7-day dose of metronidazole for the treatment of Trichomonas vaginalis among HIV-infected women". Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 55 (5): 565–71. doi:10.1097/qai.0b013e3181eda955. PMC 3058179. PMID 21423852.

Use condoms. Condoms are the best way to prevent STIs when you have sex. Because a man does not need to ejaculate (come) to give or get trichomoniasis, make sure to put the condom on before the penis touches the vagina, mouth, or anus. Other methods of birth control, like birth control pills, shots, implants, or diaphragms, will not protect you from STIs. Get tested. Be sure you and your partner are tested for STIs. Talk to each other about the test results before you have sex.

Use condoms. Condoms are the best way to prevent STIs when you have sex. Because a man does not need to ejaculate (come) to give or get trichomoniasis, make sure to put the condom on before the penis touches the vagina, mouth, or anus. Other methods of birth control, like birth control pills, shots, implants, or diaphragms, will not protect you from STIs. Get tested. Be sure you and your partner are tested for STIs. Talk to each other about the test results before you have sex.
^ Jump up to: a b Vos T, Allen C, Arora M, Barber RM, Bhutta ZA, Brown A, Carter A, et al. (GBD 2015 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence Collaborators) (October 2016). "Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015". Lancet. 388 (10053): 1545–1602. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31678-6. PMC 5055577. PMID 27733282.
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